QUOTE | FROM G. K. Chesterton




The principle is this: that in everything worth having, even in every pleasure, there is a point of pain and tedium that must be survived, so that the pleasure may revive and endure. The joy of battle comes after the first fear of death; the joy of reading Virgil comes after the bore of learning him; the glow of the seabather comes after the icy shok of the sea bath.



Similar Quotes by Tags1744

The state of no being, knows neither pleasure nor pa...

-Lailah Gifty Akita

Quote

I was aware that I was taking inordinate pleasure in...

-

Quote

The excess of pleasure is pain

-

Quote

The creed which accepts as the foundation of morals,...

-

Quote

We must risk delight. We can do without pleasure,but...

-

Quote

Life had taught her that consequences were ugly and ...

-

Quote

We live in one of the few epochs of humanity where l...

-

Quote

The greatest satisfaction comes not from chasing ple...

-

Quote

I'll sleep forever and meet you in my dreams; it'll ...

-

Quote

I've read de Sade, and Anaïs Nun, and Gravity's Rai...

-

Quote

Seek for no meaning in it; it has none. What meaning...

-

Quote

In the midst of happiness or despairin sorrow or in ...

-

Quote

The memory of the pain did not destroy the reality o...

-Orson Scott Card

Quote

Love can be simply stated to be the desire of the hu...

-

Quote

Would you agree,' he said, 'that man's sole duty is ...

-

Quote

We are, or rather our natural desire to evade pain a...

-Mokokoma Mokhonoana

Quote

Pleasure, I remind myself, is inseparable from its l...

-

Quote

And yet it takes only the smallest pleasure or pain ...

-

Quote

Face your life, its pain, its pleasure, leave no pat...

-Neil Gaiman

Quote

I wonder if it is the same for women, whether women ...

-

Quote
Copied the text: "The principle is this: that in everything worth having, even in every pleasure, there is a point of pain and tedium that must be survived, so that the pleasure may revive and endure. The joy of battle comes after the first fear of death; the joy of reading Virgil comes after the bore of learning him; the glow of the seabather comes after the icy shok of the sea bath."